City of New Orleans: Moving New Orleans Bikes

Moving New Orleans Bikes is a central initiative of Mayor Cantrell’s overall transportation plan called Moving New Orleans. Moving New Orleans Bikes began with the creation of an official city-wide vision for a connected network of low-stress bikeways and walkways reaching every corner of Orleans Parish, encompassing more than 600 miles of new routes.

Click here to visit the City of New Orleans – Moving New Orleans Bikes webpage.

During this first year of construction, the City of New Orleans has committed to building out the first 75 miles of improvements including protected bike lanes, bike/walk boulevards, high-visibility crosswalks, improved bus stops and bus islands, refurbished and brand new sidewalks, and more. These first 75 miles will be focused in Algiers and neighborhoods directly adjacent to downtown New Orleans.

The improvements which comprise Moving New Orleans Bikes will ensure everyone — people walking, biking, driving, or riding public transit — have safe access to their fair share of the road. Central to the goals described in the Moving New Orleans vision is a city where all residents can safely, easily, and affordably commute to work, visit friends, exercise, go to the store, or access healthcare and do so no matter how they move from point A to point B.

This low-stress bikeway network will have numerous benefits for residents, families, and New Orleans communities: better job access, health benefits, reduced demand for parking, and a general improved quality of life. 

Click here to view the City’s Digital Bikeway Blueprint Map to see where all of New Orleans current bike lanes and where future bike lanes will be built

Algiers

Algiers is receiving the first 11 miles of low-stress bikeways along 11 corridors. 

These corridors will connect residents to local businesses, grocery stores, schools, as well as biking and nature trails.

Construction is expected to be finished in the fall of 2020.

Public Meetings

To engage and inform the Algiers community, as well as gain feedback on the their plans for improving street safety, the City of New Orleans held public meetings on improvements coming to Upper and Lower Algiers.

The presentations contain detailed descriptions and diagrams of how the City if bringing more safety and less stress to streets in Algiers.

Click here to download the presentation for improvements in Upper Algiers.

Click here to download the presentation for improvements in Low Algiers.

For details on the City’s public meetings, visit their Moving New Orleans Bikes website.

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Corridors and Fact Sheets

As part of the Moving New Orleans Bikes Plan, 1.72 miles of streets in the Marigny and edge of the French Quarter will receive safety infrastructure improvements, including protected bike lanes, extended curbs, improved crosswalks, repaved streets, and more. 

These improvements will be implemented along 5 corridors: Franklin Avenue, Royal Street, Elysian Fields Avenue, Decatur Street, and N. Peters Street. The City of New Orleans has already presented design plans, received and implemented feedback from the community, and is expected to begin construction in the fall of 2020.

Public Meetings

Over the Summer of 2020, the City of New Orleans held public, virtual meetings to present and receive feedback on their plans for street safety improvements in the Marigny and edge of the French Quarter.

At the meetings, City officials listened to and incorporated community input into their plans. For example, the diagram to the right shows an added gateway to Franklin Ave. that came after community members asked for traffic calming measures on this street.

You can learn more about how the City of New Orleans conducted their community engagement process by reading our blog post here.

Click here to view the presentation from the City of New Orleans’ initial design meeting for improvements coming to the Marigny and edge of the French Quarter

Click here to view the presentation from the City of New Orleans’ later pre-construction meeting for improvements coming to the Marigny and edge of the French Quarter.

Corridors and Factsheets

Central City

Central City and parts of the Lower Garden District will receive 2.78 miles as part of the Moving New Orleans Bikes plan. These improvements range from parking protected bike lanes, to road repaving, green infrastructure and more. 

The improvements will happen over 5 corridors: Baronne Street, Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, Melpomeme Street, S. Broad Street, and S. Galvez street. Construction is expected to begin in the beginning of 2021.

Public Meetings

The City of New Orleans held a public pre-construction meeting on street safety improvements coming to Central City in July. At the meeting, officials from the City presented information about the current conditions of the area’s streets, and their plans to bring more safety and less stress to Central City’s streets. They also answered questions from the community and received feedback on their plans. We expect them to hold another public design meeting and address the community’s feedback soon.

Click here to view the presentation from the City of New Orleans’ pre-construction on street safety improvements coming to Central City.

Corridors and Factsheets

Timeline

When Mayor LaToya Cantrell was first sworn in, she made transportation a priority for her administration and established the Mayor’s Office of Transportation. Since then, the Office of Transportation has supported efforts to make transportation more accessible and equitable in New Orleans, including the Moving New Orleans Bikes Plan.

Starting in April 2019, the Office of Transportation embarked on a city-wide bike planning effort to create a completely connected and safer system of bike lanes that allows people on bikes to get to where they’re going safer and easier. The City held public meetings to gain input on the existing network and to hear what residents’ needed and wanted from their bikeway network.

That Summer, City officials presented the collected input and introduced the draft bikeway network map in a series of public meetings across New Orleans. Building off of previous input and collecting more feedback on the draft bikeway network map, the City then launched into a rapid design and build-out of the bikeway network.